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Arts Calendar / September 27 / Exhibitions
France and Russia: Ten Centuries Together
The display dedicated to the centuries-old history of Russian-French relations includes more than 200 pieces, among which are archival documents, personal belongings of the heads of state, diplomatic gifts and works of art. Throughout centuries they have been carefully kept by the museums, archives, libraries of both countries and above all by the royal treasury – the Armoury Chamber of the Moscow Kremlin. The exhibition opens with a unique document, recalling the events of the 11th century when the Old Russian and French ruling dynasties intermarried: the daughter of the Great Prince Yaroslav the Wise became the spouse of King Henri I. This manuscript from the funds of the National Library of France dates back to the year 1063 and has a Cyrillic inscription, presumably an autograph by Anna, daughter of Yaroslav. In 1896 a copy of this document was presented to Emperor Nicholas II during his official visit to Paris. At the same time, the Russian monarch had an opportunity to see the so-called Reims Gospel that in the 19th century was associated with Anna Yaroslavna, while a part of it was written in Cyrillic letters in Church Slavonic. The President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin presented a facsimile copy of the manuscript to the President of France Emmanuel Macron during the official visit in 2017. The Reims Gospel, being a symbol of friendly relations between the two countries, is one of the key objects of the display.
Moscow Kremlin Museums 
Ilya Repin, Known and Unknown
The exhibition is associated with the large-scale retrospective exhibitions of Repin’s work in 2021‒2022 at the Finnish National Gallery (Ateneum Art Museum) in Helsinki, and in the Petit Palais in Paris, where the Tretyakov Gallery will provide a large number of paintings and graphic works to be exhibited for a long duration (including many works from the Gallery’s permanent exhibition). The works by the “unknown” Repin include paintings and graphic works that were not part of the artist’s 2019 retrospective in Krymsky Val. The paintings by the “other” Repin were created by the artist later in his life. The chamber exhibition will bring together approximately 30 paintings by the artist created in different years, including his paintings and graphic works from the Tretyakov Gallery collection, three female portraits and the evangelical composition “The Incredulity of St. Thomas” (1920–1922) from private Moscow collections, as well as a sketch, “The Son Killer” (1909), a later version of the painting “Ivan the Terrible and his Son Ivan on November 16, 1581” (1885, State Tretyakov Gallery) from the Voronezh Kramskoy Regional Art Museum. A special focus of the exhibition will be the section devoted to the history of the masterpiece, “Ivan the Terrible and his Son Ivan on November 16, 1581”, that has been undergoing restoration since May 2018. In addition to pictorial sketches, a multimedia program will be presented to reveal the history of creating the painting as well as the modern restoration processes on the painting.
Tretyakov Art Gallery 
Jeff Cowen: Photoworks
The Moscow Museum of Modern Art together with the MAP Collection, Eric Schlosser and Michael Werner Kunsthandel present a solo exhibition of the American photographer Jeff Cowen, the first to be held in Russia. The major solo exhibition at MMOMA includes more than 170 selected works — blurry, hazy frames, abstract collages, twilight landscapes which illuminate Jeff Cowen’s artistic practice. Having developed his own principles and techniques for working with the material surface of an image, Cowen, with adamant aestheticism, turns to the archeology of the dreams, to the shadow images of otherworldly spaces, ruins, and mirages, revealing the key themes and plots of the artist’s work. Cowen’s portraits, which have a supernatural radiance, tempt the viewer to identify personages from the plays of Henrik Ibsen or the stories of James Joyce rather than our contemporaries. Inaccessible, distant, these characters only enhance the theatrical, staged — or even cinematic — atmosphere of timelessness inherent in Cowen’s individual mythology. Another feature of it is a special aspect of incompleteness that is always singled out and emphasized by the author himself as one of the most important — the constant process of transformation, the semi-magical metamorphosis of an occasion into an event. Strokes, stains, paper tears — in the sum of these techniques, it is easy to identify the echo of Abstract Expressionism and, at the same time, the inheritance of the hermeticism of alchemical practices.
Moscow Museum of Modern Art  
Melvin Sokolsky’s High Flight
The Lumiere Gallery presents Russia's first exhibition of the legendary American photographer Melvin Sokolsky. The Gallery will showcase his most recognizable works, including the iconic Bubbles series, which brought worldwide fame to the then 30-year-old Sokolsky. “We are actively studying and presenting the genre of fashion photography, which evolved in the 20th century. It is doubly important to take advantage of the opportunity to work with original prints during a photographer’s lifetime. The chance to see Melvin Sokolsky’s work in Moscow is, of course, unique, both for collectors and for those who are just beginning to discover this genre,” says the founder and director of the Lumiere Gallery, Natalia Grigorieva-Litvinskaya. The development of fashion photography in the 1960s was closely intertwined with the new technological capabilities of the time. Fashion publications were the driving forces behind the new image of a woman, her freedom and social status. The art directors of major magazines looked for young and bold photographers capable of experimenting. The golden age of the glossy magazine, together with photographers such as Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, and Melvin Sokolsky, awakened interest in the genre among galleries and museums, and subsequently, fashion began to increasingly overshadow other genres at auction sales.
Lumiere Gallery 
Other Shores. Russian Art in New York. 1924
In September the Museum of Russian Impressionism will present a research exhibition about the largest US show of Russian paintings, sculptures and graphics by a hundred prominent artists. Almost one hundred years later, visitors will have the opportunity to view more than 70 signature works from museum and private collections in Russia and abroad, including the Albertina Gallery Vienna. In 1924 more than 1000 items were displayed at the Russian Art Exhibition in New York. This was a unique cross-section of Russian art from the first two decades of the 20th century, and since the works were offered for sale, the artists selected their best pictures to send overseas. After the exhibition the paintings were scattered all over the world. The Museum found many of them in collections in the USA, Canada, the UK, Switzerland, Spain, France, Germany, Austria, Armenia, Tajikistan and other countries. This wide-ranging detective work resulted in one of the most ambitious Museum projects. It took the curators more than a year to find these works. Art historians have managed to establish the fate of several hundred pieces, and some have been rediscovered for the viewing public. The exhibition will include paintings by Leon Bakst, Igor Grabar, Boris Grigoriev, Mikhail Larionov, Ilya Mashkov, Pyotr Konchalovsky, Boris Kustodiev, Zinaida Serebryakova and other artists from the collections of the State Tretyakov Gallery, the State Russian Museum and the State Hermitage Museum, as well as from the collections of Viktor Shkulyov, Anatoly and Maya Beckerman, Roman Babichev and others.
Museum of Russian Impressionism 
Paweł Althamer. Silence
The spatial installation Silence by Polish artist Paweł Althamer is a garden for meditation built in the square in front of Garage Museum of Contemporary Art. To Althamer, each element of the garden—be it a fallen tree or a particular deciduous bush—is a hidden quote, while the composition as a whole is a unique environment where the restless city dweller of today can alter the regime of time, as if transported to a picturesque space in a past era, where the rhythm and pace of life were not by default accelerated to the limit. According to Althamer, Silence is a space where everything happens here and now. It is only in such a space that we can truly find time for ourselves. Working with the community of people with disabilities, with whom he organizes regular sculpture and drawing workshops, has been an important part of Althamer’s practice since 1993. For the artist, this special kind of collaborative authorship represents the therapeutic power of art in action, as well as art’s ability to socialize individuals whose life is otherwise almost invisible to society. For Silence, Althamer collaborated with local specialists in working with people with disabilities to create a number of meditations and spiritual and physical practices accessible to everyone, which take place in the garden at specific times. The garden meditations are based on the principle of audio description (a type of narration used to convey visual information to the blind) and require objective and non-judgmental description of objects and the space, which allows us to experience a reality that seems obvious in a different way.
Garage Museum of Contemporary Art  
Yuri Pimenov
Yuri Pimenov is an acknowledged, well-known classic of Soviet Russian art. Yuri Ivanovich was an immensely versatile person: an imaginative and bright creator of easel and decorative-monumental painting, teacher and Professor, author of countless Soviet film posters and a talented graphic artist, book and magazine illustrator. He also tried himself in sculpture, worked a lot on stage design in theatrical productions, was engaged as a production artist on the set of Soviet cinematography. Pimenov was not only an artist but also a publicist - he wrote a number of books and articles. For a long time, Pimenov was the chief artist of the magazine "Ogoniok", where he published his articles on the fine arts and prominent masters. Yuri Ivanovich was a socially active person: he was one of the organisers of the Easel Painter's Society (OST) in 1925, later participated in the artistic society called "Izobrigada", worked a lot in the Moscow Regional Union of Artists (MOSKh), was elected a member of the Presidium of the Academy of Arts of the USSR. He was teaching at the Gerasimov Institute of Cinematography (VGIK) for more than thirty years, leading a studio of painting and bringing up more than one generation of successful artists of theatre and cinema. The artist Alexander Labas described Pimenov in the 1920s: "Pimenov was very active, fast, lively, cheerful, he laughed a lot, he liked to talk about trifles, liked to dress up, to show off a bit. There was an impression that he does everything without thinking, on the move, with a smile, sometimes with a smirk, liked to laugh at someone, to joke, and then all this was instantly forgotten, and he already spoke and laughed about someone else." (Source: RA GALLERY)
New Tretyakov Gallery 
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