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Arts Calendar / December 17 / Exhibitions
Alexander III the Peacemaker
The Historical Museum opens an exhibition dedicated to the 175th anniversary of the birth of Emperor Alexander III, one of the most iconic rulers of Russia. "Alexander III was given a little over 13 years of reign. During this time he tried to lead Russia out of its disastrous political and economic situation, while at the same time setting the task of preserving and strengthening autocratic power. The Emperor in every possible way encouraged interest in the history of his own country, tried to maintain the spirit of national self-awareness, patriotic feelings and pride for his Fatherland. The purpose of our exhibition is to reveal the image of Alexander III both as a sovereign and as a person", — says Alexey Levykin, director of the Historical Museum. The archival documents displayed for the first time will reflect the complex process of solving the Empire's foreign policy problems in Europe, the Balkans and the Far East. Despite the peace policy Alexander III paid great attention to the issue of strengthening power of the Army and Navy — "the only allies of Russia". The exhibition will present samples of firearms and until recently secret evidence of the Emperor's strategic intentions regarding the Black Sea Fleet. A special place in the exposition is occupied by memorial objects, which reveal the Emperor’s personality, his world view, human qualities and family relations. Among the exhibits are school notebooks and report cards, children's weapons and a desk chair from the study in the Anichkov Palace, family photos and items from the Emperor's personal collections.
State Historical Museum 
Carl Fabergé & Fedor Rückert. Masterpieces of Russian Enamel
The exhibition presents about four hundred masterpieces made by Russian jewellery firms of the 19th – early 20th century of precious metal and covered with enamel now kept in state and private collections of Russia and the United Kingdom. The key exhibits of the display are numerous and typologically different art pieces produced by the eminent Moscow 'enamel artist' Feodor Rückert (1851-1918) and the world-famous Royal Court firm lead by Carl Fabergé (1846-1920), mainly by its Moscow branch, renowned for works in national romanticism style. F. Rückert supplied the house of C. Fabergé and other enterprises purveyors to the Royal Household with his production. A number of items are not only the examples of remarkable craftsmanship of the Russian silversmiths and enamelists but also have deep historic and symbolic significance. Some of those are diplomatic gifts, and some, bearing the Imperial symbols, were bestowed in the name of a monarch. Finally, there are private, family gifts, signs of affection and high regard, which retain engraved inscriptions in different languages. This is the evidence of the admiration people had towards art pieces made by Russian enamellists, pieces which were popular worldwide. Today they benefit the largest museum collections, stand on the peak of fame, and arouse keen interest among those who love and appreciate Russian jewellery.
Moscow Kremlin Museums 
Gustav Klimt. Gold of Modernism
Portraits, landscapes and images of nude female nature in the format of an immersive show. Exciting, sensual, innovative - those epithets accurately describe the paintings of Gustav Klimt. At the exhibition “Gustav Klimt. The Gold of Modernism” you will not only see all the major works that provided the artist with a world-wide fame, but thanks to the Cinema360 technology you will plunge inside his canvases. The oeuvres of his “golden period” literally glow from the inside and are comparable in it power on the spectator with icons. The hall space flooded with golden light represents a total multimedia installation immersing the spectator into the sensual world of female images surrounded by a charming music. The total projection area is 1200 sq.m. Portraits, landscapes, decorative compositions and images of nude nature, which carried out a revolutionary takeover in Viennese painting, are presented at the exhibition in the format of a bright and spectacular immersive show. Surrounded by music and color, the spectator seems to be flooded in a magical world.
Artplay na Yauze 
Irina Petrakova. Manifested by Disappearance
The Moscow Museum of Modern Art is happy to announce a solo exhibition of Irina Petrakova exploring the changing relationship between the body and the environment. The exhibition is held in two rooms of the Moscow Museum of Modern Art on Petrovka. The viewer will find themself in a place that has been transformed through the corporeal practices of the author with images serving as a reminder of her presence. Instead of organic traces typical for humans, the viewer will see painting and graphics — the human is replaced by the artificial, drawing becomes experiencing. Irina Petrakova is an artist and a co-organizer at the Center Red (Moscow, 2015-2018). Her recent solo exhibitions include: Come and Hide (Iragui Gallery, Moscow, 2018), Explain it to the Dark (Center Red, Moscow, 2016). She is also actively engaged in artistic and educational practice with children and adolescents. Her works are part of the collections of the Ruarts Foundation, ZARIA Center, Iragui Gallery and private collections. The artist lives and works in Moscow.
Moscow Museum of Modern Art  
Maria Yakunchikova-Weber
Maria Yakunchikova (1870–1902) is one of the most outstanding masters of the Silver Age. In her work, Art Nouveau, Symbolism, and elements of Expressionism organically intertwined with the search for a national form. During her short life Yakunchikova was able to create a significant number of works. The vector of her creative evolution was traced from a realistic, naturalistic method to modernity and symbolism, from easel art to creating decorative panels through a unique technique of carving and wood burning. Yakunchikova was exhibited in Russia and Europe, her works were reproduced in major art publications, and her cover sketch of a swan was used on several issues of the Mir Iskusstva Magazine. This anniversary exhibition of Yakunchikova will fully present for the first time the creative heritage of the master, with more than 60 paintings, and about 10 works of decorative art, as well as more than 60 watercolor studies, pastels, and etchings.
Tretyakov Gallery at Lavrushinsky Lane 
Military Awards of Russia
The exhibition is dedicated to military awards from the collection of the Moscow Kremlin Museums – orders that were awarded for valour on the battlefields, for military leadership talent, for bravery and courage in battle. The orders and medals on display demonstrate the continuity of the award policy at different stages of Russian state development. The first section of the exhibition offers an insight into military insignia of the Russian Empire – these are rare awards with swards that were presented exclusively for military feats, viz the orders of St Andrew, St Alexander Nevsky, St Vladimir and St Anne. One can explore awards of Soviet Russia and the USSR created after 1917 and based on a new ideology and its symbols in the next section of the display. Before the Great Patriotic War and during its first years, soldiers and officers of the Red Army were awarded the Order of the Red Banner, Order of Lenin, Order of the Red Star, and medals "For Courage" and "For Combat Merit". The final section of the exhibition shows the military awards of the Russian Federation, which combined the traditions and distinctive features of both order systems, the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union.
Moscow Kremlin Museums 
Oriental Treasures in the Moscow Kremlin Museums' Collection
The collection of the Moscow Kremlin Museums contains unique art pieces reflecting the centuries-old history of relations between Russia and Oriental countries. Among them are State regalia, ceremonial weapons, magnificent horse harness, pieces made of gold and precious stones, luxurious fabrics, works of stone-carving art, presented in the 16th-19th centuries as diplomatic gifts or purchased for royal use. However, in later times, during the Soviet era, the Kremlin's collection was further enriched with material evidence of the country's strengthening its international position, its high status and intensively developing cultural ties with Oriental countries. A special value of these works is reflected both in their precious decoration and the highest level of artistic performance, while their exceptional rarity emphasizes the memorial and historical significance. Many of them are directly associated with Russian rulers and prominent statesmen, as well as with great events in Russian history. These artefacts appeared in the Armory Chamber as gifts to Russian tsars from Iranian shahs and Turkish sultans in the context of diplomatic and trade contacts or as gifts to a tsar from his relatives, some valuable items got to the treasury from the escheat of famous boyars and prominent statesmen.
Moscow Kremlin Museums 
Paolo Roversi: Looking for Juliet. Pirelli Calendar 2020
“There’s a Juliet in every woman, and I will never stop looking for her,” says Roversi, who invited nine women, including Emma Watson, Claire Foy and his daughter, to present their ideal version of the Shakespearean heroine. “Some of these models really are muses for me. There is an exchange between us. They make all my dreaming about beauty and family and sensuality concrete because the connection is so strong,” said Paolo Roversi in an interview with BJP-online in November 2017. Two years on, Roversi was invited to produce the prestigious Pirelli Calendar, and yesterday, his vision and muses were unveiled. Claire Foy, Mia Goth, Chris Lee, Indya Moore, Rosalía, Yara Shahidi, Kristen Stewart, Emma Watson and Roversi’s daughter, Stella Roversi, star in the calendar’s 47th edition, Looking for Juliet. Roversi wanted to tap into the Juliet that “exists in every woman”, imagining the process as a would-be casting call to find the perfect heroine. The Italian photographer produced a portrait of each woman as if they were auditioning for the role, then asked them to reenact their version of the ideal character from Shakespeare’s drama.
Multimedia Art Museum 
Pavel Leonov: Through the Looking-Glass
The Moscow Museum of Modern Art presents Pavel Leonov: Through the Looking Glass, a retrospective exhibition marking the 100th anniversary of the artist. Pavel Leonov is one of the leading figures among the Russian self-taught painters. His works won international acclaim and in 1984 his name was included in the World Encyclopedia of Naive Art. The exposition features works from the state and private collections in Moscow and other Russian regions, which broadly cover the main themes and periods in Leonov’s work — from his first attempts in painting to the works made in the last years of his life. Even though Leonov received wide recognition in his later years, throughout the most of his career the artist did not belong to the professional art scene. Leonov’s art is closely connected with the rich folk tradition. It can be found in the themes of his paintings, in their attributes and symbols, in the depiction of human faces which resemble masks. It is also apparent in his colors which are of intrinsic value to each composition and yet define Leonov’s artistic individuality. All the works of Pavel Leonov are essentially autobiographical. Events from his personal life story are captured in each painting. The picturesque canvases, large and small, depict subjects still vivid in the author’s memory, impressions, historic events, past life situations. The cycles of paintings reproduce collisions in the artist’s uneasy life path, arranging them as a myth, a dream of a better age, a timeless utopia instead of a consistent and accurate narrative.
Moscow Museum of Modern Art  
Tomás Saraceno. Moving Atmospheres
The tenth Garage Atrium Commission is an installation by Argentinian artist Tomás Saraceno, who is known for his works at the intersection of art, technology, and environmental advocacy. A product of Saraceno’s long-standing occupation with lighter than air movement and utopian modes of co-existing, the installation for Garage is the largest presentation of his practice in Russia to date. Moving Atmospheres, a partially mirrored sphere suspended in the air, propels us toward an Aerocene epoch. Saraceno’s call to this new era is championed by the multi-disciplinary community group Aerocene. For more than a decade he has been imagining a world free from the carbon, extractivism, capitalism, and patriarchy that fuels some forms of life, a new way of being with the atmosphere and emissions-free travel, free from solar panels, lithium, helium, hydrogen, and fossil fuels. This new era stands in stark contrast to the lingering eco-traumas of the Anthropocene, the current geological age in which some human capitalistic activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment.
Garage Museum of Contemporary Art  
Where Cars and Buses feel at Home. Bakhmetevsky and other Garages
Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center presents the exhibition ‘Where Cars and Buses feel at Home. Bakhmetevsky and other Garages’ that sheds a new light onto the 1920-1930’s depicting these times through the history of a Moscow garage. The famous Le Corbusier’s formula — ‘A house is a machine for living’ — describes these dynamic times only up to a certain point. A car was born with the modern art and a garage, house for machines, became one of the symbols of the modernist architecture inspired by the industrial aesthetics. Visitors of the exhibition will discover a new world where art and technology, love and politics are woven together. The display at The Jewish Museum, located in the former building complex of the Bakhmetyev bus garage constructed in the late 1920-s, will be divided into three themed sections not only reconstructing the image of the period but also allowing to dive deep into these first decades of the Soviet motorization and to enjoy the beauty of the early garage architecture. Each section is centered around a key figure — a historical character who helps visitors to dive into the subject: Lilia Brik at the wheel of a Renault given by Vladimir Mayakovsky; Viktor Shklovsky who learned how to drive during the World War I and from time to time published satirical articles in the Za Rulem (At the Wheel) magazine; and finally, Lev Davidovitch, engineer behind almost all of the Moscow garages of the 1930-s.
Jewish Museum & Tolerance Center 
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