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Arts Calendar / July 31 / Exhibitions
Atelier E.B: Passer-by
Atelier E.B (Atelier Edinburgh-Brussels) is the name with which designer Beca Lipscombe and artist Lucy McKenzie sign their collaborative projects. Formed in 2007, Atelier E.B is a fashion label that produces using local and exploitation-free manufacturing. It operates through networks outside the system of fashion, reinventing conventional modes of display and distribution. This often involves gallery presentations, which combine art, design, and cultural research. The exhibition Atelier E.B: Passer-by is based on a two-year research project focused on issues around display and the people behind the rich and sometimes undervalued history of the twentieth-century world expos and fairs, iconic department stores, ethnographic museums and fashion in the former Socialist Bloc. The name of the project reflects Lipscombe and McKenzie’s belief that consuming fashion is not just the individual purchase of garments but also the passer-by’s glances at shop window displays and the enjoyment of fashion through books, magazines, exhibitions, and the Internet. For Atelier E.B, the nexus of the overlap between art, design, commerce, and display is centered upon the figure of the mannequin and fashion display; as modes of artistic expression and reflectors of cultural change.
Garage Museum of Contemporary Art  
Berlin Unknown. May 1945
Jewish Museum and Tolerance Center presents the exhibition «Berlin Unknown. May 1945», dedicated to the 75th Anniversary of Victory in the Great Patriotic War 1941-1945. More than 80 works of the war photographers Ilya Arons and Valery Ginsburg will be presented to the public for the first time. In spring 1945 war photographers and cinematographers entered Berlin together with the Soviet Army. After all the upheavals of the war that they have gone through, they captured the chronicles of the Victory. Unique photos of Berlin will be on display – the Reichstag building, the Brandenburg Gate, the Karlshorst quarter where the Instrument of Surrender was signed as well as the photo reports of the Military Council sessions. Ilya Arons saw active service, was decorated with the Order of Wartime Red Banner, made it to Berlin. His photos show Georgy Zhukov and Konstantin Rokossovsky, marshals, Roman Karmen, cinematographer, and Konstantin Simonov, poet, linkage on the Elbe and photos of Berlin streets in spring 1945. Valery Ginsburg, eminent cinematographer, was sent to Berlin to review the archives of the Berlin Film Studio. This is when he made photos of Berlin in ruins unprecedented by their artistry and power.
Jewish Museum & Tolerance Center 
From Dürer to Matisse
The exhibition covers five centuries of European drawing: from the late 15th to the mid-20th century. The best pieces of various national schools – Italian, French, German, Dutch, Flemish, and Russian – were selected from the Museum’s rich collection of drawings. Visitors will see rarely displayed artworks by masters such as Dürer, Veronese, Poussin, Rembrandt, Rubens, Watteau, Fragonard, Tiepolo, David, Ingres, Daumier, Friedrich, Bryullov, Degas, Renoir, van Gogh, Vrubel, Kandinsky, Marc, Nolde, Picasso, Léger, Matisse, Malevich, and Chagall. The exhibition gives insight into the variety of graphical methods and different drawing styles and demonstrates the change of styles and artistic schools in the history of drawing, which reflects the general trends of European art over several centuries.
Pushkin Fine Arts Museum 
Gustav Klimt. Gold of Modernism
Portraits, landscapes and images of nude female nature in the format of an immersive show. Exciting, sensual, innovative - those epithets accurately describe the paintings of Gustav Klimt. At the exhibition “Gustav Klimt. The Gold of Modernism” you will not only see all the major works that provided the artist with a world-wide fame, but thanks to the Cinema360 technology you will plunge inside his canvases. The oeuvres of his “golden period” literally glow from the inside and are comparable in it power on the spectator with icons. The hall space flooded with golden light represents a total multimedia installation immersing the spectator into the sensual world of female images surrounded by a charming music. The total projection area is 1200 sq.m. Portraits, landscapes, decorative compositions and images of nude nature, which carried out a revolutionary takeover in Viennese painting, are presented at the exhibition in the format of a bright and spectacular immersive show. Surrounded by music and color, the spectator seems to be flooded in a magical world.
Artplay na Yauze 
Guy Burden. Follow me
Guy Burden is one of the boldest innovators in the world of visual culture of the twentieth century. He managed to leave a profound aesthetic impression of a few generations of readers who work for glossy magazines. A unique artist with a rare taste in art, fashion, advertising and life in general, he was the author of works which have become a real breakthrough in the world of visual imagery. Aesthetics Guy Burden attracted people to a photo of fashion, helping to realize that this genre is not reducible to a simple advertising. With absolute freedom of expression and to strictly follow his creative principles, Guy Burden has created images that became a revelation for a generation. For more than 30 years of photography, Guy Burden helped broaden the scope of our perception of fashion photography, and today they continue to serve as a source of inspiration and are delighted the audience.
Lumiere Brothers Photogallery 
I.E. Tsvetkov and his Gallery. On the 175th Anniversary of the Collector
The project is timed to coincide with the anniversary of the famous Moscow collector Ivan Evgenievich Tsvetkov (1845–1917), the founder of a private art gallery. His collection included approximately 2,000 works to represent mainly everyday genre scenes, landscapes, views of old Moscow and other towns, and self-portraits of artists. Between the years 1898–1901 I. E. Tsvetkov built a two-story mansion for his collection on the Prechistenskaya Embankment, not far from the Cathedral of Christ the Savior, overlooking the Kremlin and the Tretyakov Gallery. The appearance of the facades and the interior were styled on an old Russian tower based onthe drawings and instructions of the artist V. M. Vasnetsov, a friend of Tsvetkov. Since 1909, Tsvetkov’s collection had been open to visitors in this “treasure house”. Most of the collection was transferred to the Tretyakov Gallery after the gallery was closed in 1926. This project, on the one hand, is dedicated to I. E. Tsvetkov, and on the other hand, to the life of his collection as part of the State Tretyakov Gallery and, therefore, the history of the museum.
Tretyakov Art Gallery 
Military Awards of Russia
The exhibition is dedicated to military awards from the collection of the Moscow Kremlin Museums – orders that were awarded for valour on the battlefields, for military leadership talent, for bravery and courage in battle. The orders and medals on display demonstrate the continuity of the award policy at different stages of Russian state development. The first section of the exhibition offers an insight into military insignia of the Russian Empire – these are rare awards with swards that were presented exclusively for military feats, viz the orders of St Andrew, St Alexander Nevsky, St Vladimir and St Anne. One can explore awards of Soviet Russia and the USSR created after 1917 and based on a new ideology and its symbols in the next section of the display. Before the Great Patriotic War and during its first years, soldiers and officers of the Red Army were awarded the Order of the Red Banner, Order of Lenin, Order of the Red Star, and medals "For Courage" and "For Combat Merit". The final section of the exhibition shows the military awards of the Russian Federation, which combined the traditions and distinctive features of both order systems, the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union.
Moscow Kremlin Museums 
Moscow. The Great Emptiness
The Museum of Moscow debuted photojournalist and Pulitzer Prize winner Sergey Ponomarev’s new exhibition titled “Moscow. The Great Emptiness.” The exhibition includes 45 black-and-white panoramas of the empty Russian capital, which Ponomarev captured during the coronavirus lockdown. "During the quarantine period in Moscow, I was taking photos of everything that happened in the city for the New York Times. Everyday I walked around the streets and looked for subjects... I wanted to make the city itself the main character of the photoshoots — its buildings, monuments, parks, bas-reliefs, and strips of empty intersections. I understood that this had to be more than just a photograph, this had to be a series, a photo project, a story. Every time I stopped and looked around in search of people, I turned my head in an attempt to see all the emptiness," Ponomarev says.
Museum of Moscow 
The Other East and Esoteric Knowledge in Russian Art 1905–1969
Bringing together over 150 artworks, artefacts, and archive documents, the exhibition "We Treasure Our Lucid Dreams." The Other East and Esoteric Knowledge in Russian Art 1905–1969" takes a close look at the creative projects of artists who were members of secret societies or constructed individual practices informed by their esoteric interests. Many among these bearers of “secret knowledge” fell victim to Stalin-era repressions: they were executed, sent to prison camps, abandoned their beliefs or lost their archives. Reflecting on the ways in which “secret knowledge” is preserved and passed on, the structure of the exhibition follows the symbolic cycle of “golden age” and “exile:” from the blossoming of various esoteric practices before the Russian Revolution to the banishment and execution of artists in the 1930s and 1940s; from the spiritual revival of the 1920s in the Soviet East (where many representatives of the Soviet creative intelligentsia went to work, for various reasons) to the arrests that followed and a period of “quiet” creative work thereafter.
Garage Museum of Contemporary Art  
The Russian Fairy Tale
“The Russian Fairy Tale” is a project based on a study of the worlds created in the genre of Russian fairy tales through the folk imagination, and original interpretations by contemporary Russian artists. The combination of these two lines enables the fairytale themes to be brought into the realm of reality and, conversely, the experience of the supernatural and whimsical elements in everyday life. The exposition is based on a synthesis of fine art, literature, multimedia technologies and theatrical scenery; it involves all the diversity of sensory perception. The emphasis on Russian art in the chronological range from late 19th century to the present day raises questions about the “Russianness” of figurative thinking, and about the national features in the attitudes to time and space. While exploring the exposition, the viewer will be involved in an interactive journey through the territories of various elements. The visitor “falls” through them into fairy tales, and meets with the characters, who, in turn, appear in the same context within the images of contemporary painters.
New Tretyakov Gallery 
Yerbossyn Meldibekov. Transformer
Kazakh artist Yerbossyn Meldibekov’s Garage Square Commission project is based on his research into the history of the monuments in Amir Timur Square in Tashkent, the capital of Uzbekistan. Over the past 100 years the square has had six different names and eight different monuments at its center. Meldibekov’s installation Transformer is a 4.5-meter wooden construction set with interchangeable pieces based on the square’s former monuments. The installation can be assembled in five different ways and will be rebuilt according to the calendar of Soviet, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Russian, Tajik, and Turkmen state holidays created by the artist. An ironic comment on the crisis of Central Asian identities, which Meldibekov believes has now continued for over a century, this continuous game of forms, images, and meanings is also a critique of ideological manipulations of the national idea by governments. By turning grand monuments to conquerors and state symbols into a children’s toy, the artist reminds us that entire nations can sometimes be a plaything in someone’s hands.
Garage Museum of Contemporary Art  
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